Location and Access

The Index is open to the public all year. During the academic months, hours are from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. from Monday to Friday. From mid-June to mid-September, hours are from 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Monday to Friday. The Index is closed on weekends, major holidays and for two weeks at Christmas. Visitors are welcome at all open hours and notice of an impending visit is not necessary. Tours of the Index can be organized provided advance notice is given. Computer access to the Index database is available within the archive.

Click here for a map of the campus.

The Index does not provide original photographs, but photocopies for research purposes may be made from the files. We are located in McCormick Hall on Princeton University's campus, less than five minutes walk from the train connection to New York and Philadelphia. The Index is located on the A Level of McCormick Hall, the same building as The Art Museum and the Department of Art and Archaeology.

The postal address is as follows:

Index of Christian Art
A Level McCormick Hall
Department of Art & Archaeology
Princeton University
Princeton, NJ 08544-1018

Accommodation is relatively limited in Princeton. Can we suggest that you contact the following site for a list of options:

http://www.princetonlodging.com/

Copies of the Index

Full electronic access as well as the complete hardcopy files are available at the three copies of the Index which are at:

Dumbarton Oaks
1703 32nd Street, NW
Washington, D.C. 20007
Phone: 202-339-6410
http://www.doaks.org/

The Getty Center
1200 Getty Center Drive
Los Angeles, CA 90049
Phone: 310- 440-7300
http://www.getty.edu/research/library/

Utrecht University
Library of Arts and Humanities
Drift 27
3512 BR Utrecht, Holland
Phone: 030 253 62 00
http://www.let.uu.nl/bibliotheek

The Biblioteca Apostolica Vaticana ceased it's subscription to the Index in 2005 and electronic access to the database is unavailable there.

The copies of the Index should be consulted concerning their opening hours. It is suggested that, where possible, researchers actually visit either the Index or the copies, as information from the files can rarely be provided by mail.