Digital World of Art History 2013: From Theory to Practice

Edited by Colum Hourihane

The third conference devoted to the digital world of art history to be organized by the Index of Christian Art (in conjunction with The Visual resources Collection, Department of Art & Archaeology) set out-as it always has, to examine some high level current methodologies as well as to highlight some case studies. If emphasis was placed at last year’s event on preservation and good practice policies then this year our focus was on the the image and its changing role in the field. If anything was brought to the fore in this year’s conference it was the policy of open access images for academic publishing. Whether it was discussed in relation to ArtStor or Wikipedia it is a policy that can only pay dividends for the general user.

The conference which was held on Wednesday June 26th highlighted yet again the independent nature of digitization in the arts and our need to communicate with each other. Standards and good practice policies may be available but it is also clear that much replication is taking place leading to a lot of redundancy. I am particularly grateful to all the speakers who stimulated us intellectually for the day and who have also agreed to publish their research here.

As was the case last year, we have had many requests to publish these paper beyond the confines of Princeton and nearly all the speakers have agreed to share their work. In some case they have annotated their powerpoint presentations but others have included their lecture texts. The papers have been slightly modified in some case to reflect copyright restrictions especially with regard to images but the textual material and message remains the same as was delivered in Princeton.

Colum Hourihane
Director, Index of Christian Art
July 8, 2013

Table of Contents

1. Art History in and for a Digital Age
Barbara Rockenbach
2. The William Randolph Hearst Archive: An Emerging Opportunity for Digital Art Research and Scholarship
Catherine Larkin
3. Kornbluth Photography: from private research to public archive
Genevra Kornbluth
4. Exploring Oxford Art Online, Home of Grove Art Online and the Benezit Dictionary of Artists
Kandice Rawlings
5. Bringing Digital Literacy into the Classroom: New Ways of Teaching with Images
Virginia M. G. Hall
6. Activating the “digital humanities”: Visiting the Walters’ Chamber of Wonders Online
Joaneath Spicer
7. The 'Art' of Digital Art History
Diane Zorich
 

Biographies

1. Art History in and for a Digital Age
Barbara Rockenbach, Director of Humanities and History Libraries, Columbia University

Barbara Rockenbach is the Director of the Humanities and History Libraries at Columbia University. In that role she leads a group of experienced, dedicated librarians in exploring innovative ways to support the scholarly pursuits of students and faculty by building services around deep research collections in all areas of the humanities. She also leads the development of the Digital Humanities Center, which provides services to humanities researchers working with digital texts, images, and other materials. Prior to this, Barbara held several positions at Yale University, including Director of Undergraduate and Library Research Education, Instructional Services Librarian in the Arts Library, and writing instructor in the English Department. She has also worked at both JSTOR and ARTstor. She has a B.A. in English Literature from the University of Illinois, an MLIS from the University of Pittsburgh, and an MA in Art History from Hunter College.

 

2. The William Randolph Hearst Archive: An Emerging Opportunity for Digital Art Research and Scholarship
Catherine Larkin, Departmental Head, Digital Initiatives and the Art Image Library, Long Island University, C. W. Post Campus

Catherine Larkin received the Ph.D. in 2010 from the Palmer School of Library and Information Science, College of Information and Computer Science, Long Island University, Brookville, New York. Her dissertation research focused on the information-seeking behaviors and processes of visual arts humanities scholars. She has a MA in Art History with a concentration in Medieval Art from the City University of New York, Queens College, and a BA in Art History from LIU. Catherine served as Visual Resources Curator and adjunct professor of Art History at LIU from 1993-2003. In September 2003, she was appointed to the faculty as Head of Digital Initiatives and the Art Image Library. Catherine also continues to teach in the Art History program.

 

3. Kornbluth Photography: from private research to public archive
Genevra Kornbluth, Kornbluth Photography

Genevra Kornbluth is an historian of the luxury arts as well as a photographer. She holds a Ph.D. in art history from the University of North Carolina, and has served as a Director of the International Center of Medieval Art. She taught art history for 20 years at the University of Maryland, College Park. She has published extensively on western Medieval, Byzantine, and Roman engraved gems, metalwork, coins, and seals. Her first book, Engraved Gems of the Carolingian Empire (Penn State University Press, 1995), features photographs of rock crystal intaglios. Kornbluth discovered in the early 1980s that she could not purchase the detailed images that she needed. She therefore developed new techniques to illustrate what makes each object different from all others. Since 2009 she has been the principle at Kornbluth Photography. She is gradually digitizing thirty years' photographs, as well as adding recently completed images which are available on her web site.

 

4. Exploring Oxford Art Online, Home of Grove Art Online and the Benezit Dictionary of Artists
Kandice Rawlings, Associate Editor, Oxford Art Online

Kandice Rawlings is Associate Editor of Oxford Art Online at Oxford University Press in New York. She studied Italian Renaissance art and taught art history at Rutgers University, where she wrote her dissertation on Venetian painters’ signatures of the late 15th and early 16th centuries. In addition to her work on signatures, her research has also explored trompe-l’oeil motifs in Renaissance paintings and modes of exchange between Italian and Northern European artists in the 15th century. Her essay “Andrea Mantegna’s St Mark and the Origins of the Cartellino” was recently published in Reflections on Renaissance Venice: A Celebration of Patricia Fortini Brown (2013). Since joining Oxford University Press in 2011, Kandice has also contributed entries to the Benezit Dictionary of Artists and served as development editor for the Benezit Dictionary of British Graphic Artists and Illustrators (2012) and the Benezit Dictionary of Asian Artists (2012).

 

5. Bringing Digital Literacy into the Classroom: New Ways of Teaching with Images
Virginia M. G. Hall, Senior Instructional Designer, Center for Educational Resources, Johns Hopkins University

Macie Hall holds A.B. and M.A. degrees in History of Art from Princeton University (1973) and Johns Hopkins University (1978) respectively. She has been supporting faculty teaching with technology at Johns Hopkins since 1987, first as Curator of the History of Art Visual Resources Collection, then as a Senior Information Technology Specialist in the Krieger School of Arts and Sciences, and more recently as a Senior Instructional Designer in the Center for Educational Resources. Her current position supports the application and implementation of technology to pedagogy in academic disciplines. In 1994 she began pursuing ways in which emerging digital imaging technologies could be used in the study and teaching of the history of art. She became interested in the related copyright and fair use issues and has published a number of articles on intellectual property rights and the reproduction of images of art in the digital age. More recently she has worked on the practical application of digital literacy skills in course work to prepare students for 21st century careers. She is the editor of the blog The Innovative Instructor.

 

6. Activating the “digital humanities”: Visiting the Walters’ Chamber of Wonders Online
Joaneath Spicer, The James A. Murnaghan Curator of Renaissance and Baroque Art, The Walters Art Museum

Joaneath Spicer received her BA from Smith College and PhD from Yale University. After teaching at the University of Toronto for over fifteen years, she came to the Walters in 1990. Reflecting variety of interests, her publications range over Netherlandish drawings, art and science at the court of Rudolf II in Prague ca. 1600, body language, the Chamber of Wonders, collecting bronzes in the Renaissance, Renaissance perspective, and Africans in Renaissance Europe. Her exhibitions include The Allure of Bronze (1995), Going for Baroque (1995), Masters of Light, Dutch Painters in Utrecht in the Golden Age (1997-98), and most recently Revealing the African Presence in Renaissance Europe, which just closed at the Princeton University Art Museum. In 1998-2005 she focused on the reinstallation of the Renaissance and Baroque collections in a way intended to reflect the settings for the use and appreciation of the art in its own time, for example, the acclaimed recreation of a 17th-century Chamber of Art and Wonders, an installation unique in the Americas.

 

7. The 'Art' of Digital Art History
Diane Zorich, Cultural Heritage Consultant, Princeton

Diane M. Zorich consults on digital strategies and digitization issues in cultural and educational organizations. Her clients include institutions such as the Smithsonian, the National Gallery of Art and the Metropolitan Museum of Art, as well as organizations such as the American Association of Museums and the J. Paul Getty Trust. Before establishing her consultancy, Diane was data manager at the Association of Systematics Collections in Washington, D.C. and documentation manager at Harvard University’s Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology. She also served as past president and board members of the Museum Computer Network and chairs that Organization’s intellectual property group. She is the author of Transitioning to a Digital World: Art History, Its Research Centers, and Digital Scholarship (2012, Samuel H. Kress Foundation); A Survey of Digital Humanities Centers in the United States (2008, Council of Library and Information Resource); Introduction to Managing Digital Assets: Options for Cultural and Educational Organizations (1999, J. Paul Getty Trust); and Developing Intellectual Property Policies: A “How To” Guide for Museums (2003, Canadian Heritage Information Network). She also co-authored Beyond the Silos of the LAMs: Collaboration among Libraries, Archives and Museums (2008, OCLC Programs and Research) and has written numerous articles and chapters on information policy and digital scholarship for art history, museum, and library journals and books. Diane has graduate degrees in anthropology and museum studies from New York University, is based in Princeton, NJ and on Twitter at @dzorich.